Articles

Winter Sunglasses, Not Just for Snowbirds

by
Brian Campbell

Buying sunglasses in February? That means that you are heading south for a winter vacation, right? Not necessarily. In fact, you may have a better reason for wearing sunglasses if you are staying here. Are you aware that the sun’s rays can affect you more in the winter than in the summer? Are you also aware that your eyes may be in danger, even on cloudy days? It may be a good time to update you on winter eye safety.

The Dangers of Ultra Violet Radiation

Understanding Glaucoma

by
Brian Campbell

According to the Canadian Association of Optometrists, Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness in Canada. Called the “Silent Thief of Sight”, glaucoma is actually the name given to a group of diseases that cause progressive damage to the optic nerve, eventually leading to vision loss and even blindness. Since January is Glaucoma Awareness Month, this would be an ideal time to study the causes and prevention of this condition.

What Do We Know About Glaucoma?

Santa Glasses!

A patient recently sent us a photo — he was thrilled that we were able to find him some round “santa glasses” to finish off his costume for his role at a church Christmas Party!

We were also thrilled to help put the finishing touch on this special Santa. If you need special frames to help you look more like Santa Claus (or John Lennon), let us know!

Keeping an Eye on High Blood Pressure

Since World Diabetes Day was on November 14th, now may be a good time to discuss a condition that often goes hand in hand with Diabetes, and that is Hypertension, or High Blood Pressure. I’m sure that everyone has heard the warnings about high blood pressure increasing the risk of stroke, heart failure and kidney disease. But are you aware that high blood pressure can damage your eyes as well?

Hypertension and Vision Loss

The Connection Between Vision and Diabetes

November 14th is World Diabetes Day, a day dedicated to global recognition of diabetes and how it affects everyone. It is a safe bet that virtually everyone in Canada has heard of, and likely knows someone who is living with diabetes. Currently, there are nearly 11 million people living with either diabetes or prediabetes, a disease that causes the body to either fail to produce insulin, or makes it incapable of using it. Since insulin helps the body control blood sugar, people with diabetes suffer from high blood sugar levels. You may be aware that high blood sugar can damage your body’s organs, but were you aware that your eyes were included in the potential damage?

Winterizing Your Eyes

Over the last few weeks we have witnessed the leaves on the trees turning colour and falling, the geese gathering together and bailing out for warmer climates, an extreme drop in temperature and even the first signs of, dare I say it, snow. There is no denying it, winter is upon us once again. Time to get out the heavy coats and boots, put your winter tires on your car, and prepare for another Manitoba winter. But have you thought about including your eyes in your winter preparations? Are you aware that winter can be a dangerous season for your eyes?

Having a Vision Wise Halloween

Halloween may be the most stress free, fun holiday we have. In spite of its origins, steeped in pagan harvest festivals and honouring the dead, Halloween has turned into a fun night involving children dressing up in costumes, varying from scary to funny, and going door to door begging for candy. Adults even get in on the fun by going out to parties and dances that often involve a contest for the best, scariest and most original costume. But it isn’t always just fun and games. Halloween comes with its own dangers. Some people have been known to put unhealthy substances in the candy they hand out, so parents have to be sure to go through the candy their kids bring home, throwing out anything that looks suspicious. On October 31st it gets dark early so visibility is poor, and there may be rain or snow to deal with, so walking outside may be challenging. But what about the costumes themselves? Have you safety proofed them? Are you aware that some costumes, masks and accessories could be dangerous to your child’s vision, or even your own if you dress up for Halloween?

The Danger of Optic Neuritis

Not much is known about what causes Optic Neuritis, an inflammation of the optic nerve. It often flares up suddenly, usually in connection with an infection, virus or nerve disease. There is a strong connection between optic neuritis and Multiple Sclerosis (MS), and often one of the early symptoms of MS is an optic neuritis flare up,

What are the Symptoms of Optic Neuritis?

World Sight Day 2018

World Sight Day is a global event, originally created in 2000 by the SightFirst Campaign of the Lions Club Foundation to raise awareness of vision impairment and blindness worldwide. Since then it has been picked up and coordinated by the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB) in cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO). It is held on the second Thursday of October every year. This year’ World Sight Day falls on Thursday, October 11th and the theme is Eye Care Everywhere.

What are the Statistics of Vision Impairment and Blindness Worldwide?

Making Your Child’s Vision a Priority

The Canadian Association of Optometrists has declared October Children’s Vision Month. In their words, “Regardless of your age or physical health, an annual comprehensive eye exam helps detect vision issues at an early stage, improving treatment options.” That is why they recommend that a child’s first visit to the optometrist should be between six and nine months of age, the second visit at age three, the third just before he/she begins school, then annually thereafter until age 18.

Why Should my Baby Visit the Optometrist?