What Does it Mean to be Visually Impaired?

by
Brian Campbell

 

Visual Impairment is defined as having a vision problem that cannot be corrected to bring it to a level that we would consider “normal.” The most extreme case of visual impairment, of course, is blindness. When one’s eyes aren’t that severe, but are still impaired, it is referred to as Low Vision. Approximately 1.3 billion people world-wide are living with some form of visual impairment. In Canada, approximately six percent of adults are visually impaired. But what do we know about visual impairment?

What does it mean to be Legally Blind?

Making Your Child’s Vision a Priority

The Canadian Association of Optometrists has declared October Children’s Vision Month. In their words, “Regardless of your age or physical health, an annual comprehensive eye exam helps detect vision issues at an early stage, improving treatment options.” That is why they recommend that a child’s first visit to the optometrist should be between six and nine months of age, the second visit at age three, the third just before he/she begins school, then annually thereafter until age 18.

Why Should my Baby Visit the Optometrist?

Will my Child Inherit my Eye Problems?

We know that many things that make us who we are can be inherited from our parents, hair and eye colour, facial features, height, or the lack thereof. Even some personality traits can be attributed to genetics, an easy going manner, or conversely, stubbornness, a love for reading or for taking apart and rebuilding things, a love of the outdoors. Other less desirable things can also be hereditary, such as arthritis, heart conditions or high blood pressure. But what about vision related problems? Can they also be inherited? Well, in some cases yes, but not necessarily.

Will you get your parent’s poor eyesight?

What is Vision Therapy?

So your Optometrist has discovered a problem with your, or possibly your child’s, vision. The next thing they will do is suggest a treatment plan. Depending on the problem, this could be corrective lenses (glasses or contact lenses) medication, or even eye surgery. Or they may suggest Vision Therapy. Vision Therapy? Do you mean eye exercises? Well, not exactly.

Vision Therapy by any other name

Vision and Your Brain

March 12th to 18th is Brain Awareness Week. Considering that vision is controlled by your brain, this would be a great time to discuss how your brain affects what you see, how it works, and what can go wrong.

How the Eye and Brain Function Together