Living with Photophobia

In spite of its name, Photophobia is not actually a fear of light. If you have it, your eyes are extremely sensitive to light. In fact, any form of light can cause extreme discomfort and pain. In most cases, only bright light will cause symptoms, but in some cases, any light can bring on a reaction.

What Causes Photophobia?

Winter Sunglasses, Not Just for Snowbirds

Buying sunglasses in February? That means that you are heading south for a winter vacation, right? Not necessarily. In fact, you may have a better reason for wearing sunglasses if you are staying here. Are you aware that the sun’s rays can affect you more in the winter than in the summer? Are you also aware that your eyes may be in danger, even on cloudy days? It may be a good time to update you on winter eye safety.

The Dangers of Ultra Violet Radiation

The Connection Between Vision and Diabetes

November 14th is World Diabetes Day, a day dedicated to global recognition of diabetes and how it affects everyone. It is a safe bet that virtually everyone in Canada has heard of, and likely knows someone who is living with diabetes. Currently, there are nearly 11 million people living with either diabetes or prediabetes, a disease that causes the body to either fail to produce insulin, or makes it incapable of using it. Since insulin helps the body control blood sugar, people with diabetes suffer from high blood sugar levels. You may be aware that high blood sugar can damage your body’s organs, but were you aware that your eyes were included in the potential damage?

Winterizing Your Eyes

Over the last few weeks we have witnessed the leaves on the trees turning colour and falling, the geese gathering together and bailing out for warmer climates, an extreme drop in temperature and even the first signs of, dare I say it, snow. There is no denying it, winter is upon us once again. Time to get out the heavy coats and boots, put your winter tires on your car, and prepare for another Manitoba winter. But have you thought about including your eyes in your winter preparations? Are you aware that winter can be a dangerous season for your eyes?

Protecting Your Eyes from Blue Light

We are all familiar with sunlight, and many of us are aware that sunlight consists of a variety of colours, both visible and invisible to the human eye. Each of these colours represents a different energy wavelength. Most of us should be familiar with the effects of Ultraviolet (UV) rays on our skin.  If you have made the mistake of looking directly into the sun, or even snow on a sunny day, you will also be aware of what UV radiation can do to your eyes. But there is another light that is becoming almost as much of a concern, and that is Blue Light.

June is Cataract Awareness Month

The month of June is Cataract Awareness Month. Most people have heard of cataracts, but what do you really know about them? Do you know what causes them? How to prevent them? Are you aware of the warning signs? The Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) says that cataracts are the leading cause of blindness in adults, and that more than 2.5 million Canadians have them, so it is a very good idea to learn as much about them as possible.

What are Cataracts?

Sun Awareness Week Begins May 28

This week is Sun Awareness Week. Over the last few years the sun has been the subject of some pretty confusing mixed reviews: Sunlight is good for you – No! It’s bad for you. You need to get out in the sunshine – You need to protect yourself from the sun’s rays. So which is the truth? Well, actually both. Sunlight is necessary for good overall health in all living things. It warms the air and helps plants to grow, and it provides a major source of Vitamin D needed for good health in humans. But like many good things, too much of a good thing can have a negative effect. Just as too much sunshine can dry out and kill plant life, overexposure to the sun’s rays can burn and damage our skin, and also our eyes. But how does this happen?

What You Need to Know About UV Rays

Spring brings with it longer daylight hours and everyone loves a bright, sunny day. The positive effect of sunlight is manifold. Sunshine provides Vitamin D, which is necessary for good health, it warms the air and is very important in the growing process of plants, flowers and trees. It also is great in raising the spirits. Research has shown that sunlight improves a person’s mood and can decrease depression. Unfortunately, the effects of sunlight are not all positive. Ultraviolet light coming from the sun can damage your skin. It can also do damage to your eyesight.

What is Ultraviolet Light?

Getting to Know Your Optometrist

March 23rd is World Optometry Day, an excellent time to get to know your Optometrist. Question 1: What do you know about your Optometrist? Do you know what they do?  Question 2: When was the last time you saw yours?  Question 3…Wait! Why don’t we work on questions one and two first, and that sneaky Question 1.5 I snuck in the middle.

What is an Optometrist?

Nutrition and Your Eyes

March is National Nutrition Month, a very good time to discuss the effect of diet on your vision. The average rabbit can tell you about the importance of carrots for your eyesight, but what other foods can help?

Aging and Eye Disease

We all know that as we get older, our bodies wear down and need more maintenance and upkeep. The same is true for our eyes. Some common eye diseases that are related to getting older are: Cataracts, Diabetic Retinopathy, Dry Eye Syndrome, Glaucoma, and Macular Degeneration.  Many of these age related conditions can be avoided or controlled by maintaining a healthy lifestyle, not smoking, getting regular exercise, and eating healthy. But what is a good diet to maintain eye health?