Winter Sunglasses, Not Just for Snowbirds

Buying sunglasses in February? That means that you are heading south for a winter vacation, right? Not necessarily. In fact, you may have a better reason for wearing sunglasses if you are staying here. Are you aware that the sun’s rays can affect you more in the winter than in the summer? Are you also aware that your eyes may be in danger, even on cloudy days? It may be a good time to update you on winter eye safety.

The Dangers of Ultra Violet Radiation

Keeping an Eye on High Blood Pressure

Since World Diabetes Day was on November 14th, now may be a good time to discuss a condition that often goes hand in hand with Diabetes, and that is Hypertension, or High Blood Pressure. I’m sure that everyone has heard the warnings about high blood pressure increasing the risk of stroke, heart failure and kidney disease. But are you aware that high blood pressure can damage your eyes as well?

Hypertension and Vision Loss

Winterizing Your Eyes

Over the last few weeks we have witnessed the leaves on the trees turning colour and falling, the geese gathering together and bailing out for warmer climates, an extreme drop in temperature and even the first signs of, dare I say it, snow. There is no denying it, winter is upon us once again. Time to get out the heavy coats and boots, put your winter tires on your car, and prepare for another Manitoba winter. But have you thought about including your eyes in your winter preparations? Are you aware that winter can be a dangerous season for your eyes?

Protecting Your Eyes from Blue Light

We are all familiar with sunlight, and many of us are aware that sunlight consists of a variety of colours, both visible and invisible to the human eye. Each of these colours represents a different energy wavelength. Most of us should be familiar with the effects of Ultraviolet (UV) rays on our skin.  If you have made the mistake of looking directly into the sun, or even snow on a sunny day, you will also be aware of what UV radiation can do to your eyes. But there is another light that is becoming almost as much of a concern, and that is Blue Light.

Sun Awareness Week Begins May 28

This week is Sun Awareness Week. Over the last few years the sun has been the subject of some pretty confusing mixed reviews: Sunlight is good for you – No! It’s bad for you. You need to get out in the sunshine – You need to protect yourself from the sun’s rays. So which is the truth? Well, actually both. Sunlight is necessary for good overall health in all living things. It warms the air and helps plants to grow, and it provides a major source of Vitamin D needed for good health in humans. But like many good things, too much of a good thing can have a negative effect. Just as too much sunshine can dry out and kill plant life, overexposure to the sun’s rays can burn and damage our skin, and also our eyes. But how does this happen?

What You Need to Know About UV Rays

Spring brings with it longer daylight hours and everyone loves a bright, sunny day. The positive effect of sunlight is manifold. Sunshine provides Vitamin D, which is necessary for good health, it warms the air and is very important in the growing process of plants, flowers and trees. It also is great in raising the spirits. Research has shown that sunlight improves a person’s mood and can decrease depression. Unfortunately, the effects of sunlight are not all positive. Ultraviolet light coming from the sun can damage your skin. It can also do damage to your eyesight.

What is Ultraviolet Light?

Nutrition and Your Eyes

March is National Nutrition Month, a very good time to discuss the effect of diet on your vision. The average rabbit can tell you about the importance of carrots for your eyesight, but what other foods can help?

Aging and Eye Disease

We all know that as we get older, our bodies wear down and need more maintenance and upkeep. The same is true for our eyes. Some common eye diseases that are related to getting older are: Cataracts, Diabetic Retinopathy, Dry Eye Syndrome, Glaucoma, and Macular Degeneration.  Many of these age related conditions can be avoided or controlled by maintaining a healthy lifestyle, not smoking, getting regular exercise, and eating healthy. But what is a good diet to maintain eye health?

February is AMD and Low Vision Awareness Month

February has been dedicated to raising awareness of AMD and Low Vision in Canada. Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in those over 50 and often comes on so slowly that people generally don’t notice it until their vision has been severely impaired.

What is Age Related Macular Degeneration?

The macula is a tiny piece at the back of the retina which controls your sharp central vision. This is the area affected by AMD, beginning by attacking your ability to see fine details. It may begin with having trouble reading fine print, or possibly a blur in your central vision. Eventually you will have trouble reading, driving, or doing an activity which requires the ability to see clearly. Left untreated, it will very likely cause total blindness.

How Smoking Affects Your Vision

Smoking is bad for you. Yes, I know, you’ve heard it all before. All those warnings about how smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer and heart disease. How even second hand smoke can have a negative effect on your health. But just in case you haven’t received enough reasons to kick the habit yet, here is one more. Did you know that smoking can also affect your eyesight?

Smoking and Cataracts

What You Need to Know About Blue Light

Perhaps you’ve heard the term “blue light”, but aren’t sure if it affects you or not. There are definitely some misconceptions about blue light, where it’s found and the potentially harmful effects, so hopefully this post can help to shed some ‘light’ on the situation.

Where is blue light found?
Blue light is everywhere. Smartphones and other digital devices have been targeted as the main blue light culprits, but the truth is, sunlight is the main source of blue light. Being outdoors during daylight is where most of us get the majority of our blue light exposure. There are also many man-made, indoor sources of blue light, such as fluorescent and LED lighting and flat-screen televisions.