What You Should Know About Your Child’s Vision

Mid-August may not be the time you want to be thinking about kids going back-to-school, but unfortunately, September is right around the corner, and your kids need to be ready. Along with those school supplies, have you made sure that their eyes are ready for another school year? After all, the best high-tech equipment in the world won’t do any good if your child can’t see it properly. When was the last time your child saw an optometrist?

How Often Does my Child Need to Have His/Her Eyes Tested?

Understanding Glaucoma

According to the Canadian Association of Optometrists, Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness in Canada. Called the “Silent Thief of Sight”, glaucoma is actually the name given to a group of diseases that cause progressive damage to the optic nerve, eventually leading to vision loss and even blindness. Since January is Glaucoma Awareness Month, this would be an ideal time to study the causes and prevention of this condition.

What Do We Know About Glaucoma?

As of yet, we still don’t know the precise cause of glaucoma. For the most part, glaucoma is associated with high fluid pressure in the eye, but there are some exceptions to that rule.

Making Your Child’s Vision a Priority

The Canadian Association of Optometrists has declared October Children’s Vision Month. In their words, “Regardless of your age or physical health, an annual comprehensive eye exam helps detect vision issues at an early stage, improving treatment options.” That is why they recommend that a child’s first visit to the optometrist should be between six and nine months of age, the second visit at age three, the third just before he/she begins school, then annually thereafter until age 18.

Why Should my Baby Visit the Optometrist?

Retinal Detachment, What You Should Know

How much do you know about what makes your eye work? Do you know what the retina is? The retina is made up of light-sensitive layers of tissue lining the back of your eyeball. This tissue collects visual input and send it through your optic nerve to your brain. Your brain uses this input to see the world around you. Now imagine what would happen if your retina was damaged. Unfortunately, this is a very real possibility.

What is Retinal Detachment?

Will my Child Inherit my Eye Problems?

We know that many things that make us who we are can be inherited from our parents, hair and eye colour, facial features, height, or the lack thereof. Even some personality traits can be attributed to genetics, an easy going manner, or conversely, stubbornness, a love for reading or for taking apart and rebuilding things, a love of the outdoors. Other less desirable things can also be hereditary, such as arthritis, heart conditions or high blood pressure. But what about vision related problems? Can they also be inherited? Well, in some cases yes, but not necessarily.

Will you get your parent’s poor eyesight?

Making Children’s Eye Exams a Part of your Back to School Planning

Summer always seems to fly by so fast and the next thing you know, September is right around the corner and it’s already time to start getting your children ready to go back to school. But in the flurry of books and pencils, backpacks, crayons and calculators, making sure that their vision is up to par is every bit as important as assuring that they have enough binders. When was their last eye exam? Have they been squinting while watching TV or looking at a computer screen? Should you be scheduling an appointment with your optometrist?

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Astigmatism

This is an interesting subject in that the first misconception that needs to be cleared up is its name: Astigmatism, not a Stigmatism. The next thing you need to know is that it is not an eye disease, it is a refractive error similar to nearsightedness (Myopia) and farsightedness (Hyperopia). Simply put, it is a condition where the eye focuses light improperly.

What causes Astigmatism?

How to Get Contact Lenses That You are Happy With

Contact lenses have always had mixed reviews. Some people love them, some hate them; some would never wear them while some wouldn’t do without them. But history reveals a pattern; the longer it has been since a person last tried wearing contact lenses, the more likely it is for the review to be negative. And for good reason. Technology has come a long way over the years in making better, more versatile and more comfortable contact lenses, and it continues to improve. Still, whether to wear glasses or contact lenses is always a very personal decision.

What are Nearsighted, Farsighted and Astigmatism?

Your eye is a delicate instrument that, when working properly, allows you to see the world around you, both near and far. There are a number of things, accident, infection, disease, etc. that can damage the eye and cause it to function less than perfectly. Some of these things may be temporary and correct themselves over time. Some may require medication or surgery. And some may require corrective lenses – Glasses. The following are three common conditions which can affect your eyes as early as childhood and are often treated with a prescription for glasses. They are: Nearsightedness, Farsightedness and Astigmatism.