Fireworks and Your Eyes

Summer is almost upon us, the weather is getting warmer, and children are anxiously counting the days until summer holidays begin.  Let us not forget the celebration that marks the official kick off of summer, Canada Day, July 1st. Canada Day brings with it, picnics, barbeques, concerts and, of course, fireworks. There will be a number of large fireworks displays across the country, but maybe you want to put on your own display. You’ve read the instructions, made sure to find a safe place to launch your fireworks in order not to set the surrounding area on fire. You have a pail of water and maybe even a hose on hand, just in case. But have you considered eye safety when working with fireworks? If not, there are a few things you need to know.

Living with Photophobia

In spite of its name, Photophobia is not actually a fear of light. If you have it, your eyes are extremely sensitive to light. In fact, any form of light can cause extreme discomfort and pain. In most cases, only bright light will cause symptoms, but in some cases, any light can bring on a reaction.

What Causes Photophobia?

The Facts About Alcohol and Your Vision

I’m sure that everyone has heard about the dangers of alcohol abuse at one time or another; increased risk of heart disease, liver disease, stroke, cancer, depression, the list goes on and on. Add to that the dangers of addiction, the risks of drinking and driving, or the effect excessive drinking can have on family relationships, friendships and job performance. They all paint a pretty bleak picture, yet some people just don’t get the message. So let’s add another effect that most people may not think of. Are you aware that excessive alcohol use can damage your eyes?

What Does it Mean to be Visually Impaired?

Visual Impairment is defined as having a vision problem that cannot be corrected to bring it to a level that we would consider “normal.” The most extreme case of visual impairment, of course, is blindness. When one’s eyes aren’t that severe, but are still impaired, it is referred to as Low Vision. Approximately 1.3 billion people world-wide are living with some form of visual impairment. In Canada, approximately six percent of adults are visually impaired. But what do we know about visual impairment?

What does it mean to be Legally Blind?

The Connection Between Vision and Diabetes

November 14th is World Diabetes Day, a day dedicated to global recognition of diabetes and how it affects everyone. It is a safe bet that virtually everyone in Canada has heard of, and likely knows someone who is living with diabetes. Currently, there are nearly 11 million people living with either diabetes or prediabetes, a disease that causes the body to either fail to produce insulin, or makes it incapable of using it. Since insulin helps the body control blood sugar, people with diabetes suffer from high blood sugar levels. You may be aware that high blood sugar can damage your body’s organs, but were you aware that your eyes were included in the potential damage?

Having a Vision Wise Halloween

Halloween may be the most stress free, fun holiday we have. In spite of its origins, steeped in pagan harvest festivals and honouring the dead, Halloween has turned into a fun night involving children dressing up in costumes, varying from scary to funny, and going door to door begging for candy. Adults even get in on the fun by going out to parties and dances that often involve a contest for the best, scariest and most original costume. But it isn’t always just fun and games. Halloween comes with its own dangers. Some people have been known to put unhealthy substances in the candy they hand out, so parents have to be sure to go through the candy their kids bring home, throwing out anything that looks suspicious. On October 31st it gets dark early so visibility is poor, and there may be rain or snow to deal with, so walking outside may be challenging. But what about the costumes themselves? Have you safety proofed them? Are you aware that some costumes, masks and accessories could be dangerous to your child’s vision, or even your own if you dress up for Halloween?

World Sight Day 2018

World Sight Day is a global event, originally created in 2000 by the SightFirst Campaign of the Lions Club Foundation to raise awareness of vision impairment and blindness worldwide. Since then it has been picked up and coordinated by the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB) in cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO). It is held on the second Thursday of October every year. This year’ World Sight Day falls on Thursday, October 11th and the theme is Eye Care Everywhere.

What are the Statistics of Vision Impairment and Blindness Worldwide?

Making Your Child’s Vision a Priority

The Canadian Association of Optometrists has declared October Children’s Vision Month. In their words, “Regardless of your age or physical health, an annual comprehensive eye exam helps detect vision issues at an early stage, improving treatment options.” That is why they recommend that a child’s first visit to the optometrist should be between six and nine months of age, the second visit at age three, the third just before he/she begins school, then annually thereafter until age 18.

Why Should my Baby Visit the Optometrist?

Heterochromia – An Eye of a Different Colour

We are used to people having different eye colours, brown, blue, green, hazel, etc. We may even have seen someone whose eye colour appears to change, depending on lighting. But have you ever met someone who has two distinct different eye colours? Have you ever wondered what may cause something like that to happen?

What is Heterochromia?

All About Eye Colour

The eyes have it. Colour that is. Blue, brown, green, hazel and more. But what does eye colour mean? And what determines what colour your eyes will be? Over the years there have been attempts to predict a new baby’s eye colour based on the eye colour of its parents and grandparents, but the fact is, it isn’t that simple.

What Determines Eye Colour